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Citizenship

This tag is associated with 2 posts

One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter – Is it?

I just read an article in the New York times on Suspected Hackers, a Sense of Social Protest. It made me think of the often quoted “One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter“.

For me the facts are clear. Nobody should attack the infrastructure or privacy of somebody else. Full stop. I cannot see that attacks can lead to anything positive and we have had plenty of examples showing that peaceful protest in the end works best to initiate change. However, other people see it different. They see it as a kind of social protest if they direct attacks at targets that they see as “evil”. Might these targets be individuals, corporations or governments. And then there are the ones that don’t think at all. That just follow a “cool” call for action. Have you ever seen the youtube video where an anonymous branch calls for attacking Telefonica? Pretty cool I must say. If I would be bored that weekend and looking for something to do – anything really – to fit into a group…. I can see why kids are tempted to point their Low Orbit Ion Cannons pretty much anywhere.

The part that worries me is not so much the individual person that might or might not participate in an attack. What worries me is that we as a society don’t have an understanding what is acceptable behaviour and what not. Sure – we might have a legal definition in some countries – but then does that help much? What we need to come to is a social value of what is acceptable and what not. What is a terrorist – and what is a freedom fighter. What differentiates them from eachother. Only then we can sit down and talk to our kids, our friends, our employees about values. Only then we can blog about it – about making people think about what they are doing. Make them aware of the line that they are crossing when they tinker with other people’s privacy and with intellectual property of enterprises, governments etc.

I don’t have the answer. But I am putting this out as a starting point to talk about it. Do the first step, take this and start talking about it and hopefully make some people think about values. Talk to somebody and lets start a snowball effect. Lets take this as a start to accept other’s privacy and values and use our right of free speech and social protest where we have them – and with that help others to achieve what we already have . Freedom of expression. But it comes with a price – and the price is responsibility and values – and we need to get better in accepting our responsibility.

New Microsoft Security Incident Report – current and emerging threats

 

This morning the microsoft trustworthy computing team released the new Security Incident Report (SIR). The report provides in-depth perspectives on software vulnerabilities, software vulnerability exploits, malicious and potentially unwanted software, and security breaches in both Microsoft and third party software.

And why is this relevant? While reading a crime novel has certainly more entertainment value, the report gives an impression on where cybercrime is heading and how the threats are evolving. This has relevance for security experts, government officials but also for everybody using the internet. Here are some information that I found especially interesting:

  • Cybercriminals continue in deceiving customers through “marketing-like” campains and fake product promotions.
  • Pornpop is an adware family that attempts to display adult advertising. In the 4th quarter of 2010 it was the most prevalent malware worldwide and was cleaned from nearly 4 million systems by Microsoft’s anti malware desktop products. Cybercrime has definitely moved to becoming a business.
  • Phishing attacks to social networking sites jump 8.3% to 84.5% which shows that criminals have seen success with social engineering based approaches especially on social networking sites.
  • Specifically to Switzerland. The MSRT detected malware on 4.1 of every 1’000 computers scanned in Switzerland in 4Q10. This compares to an average worldwide of 8.7 of every 1’000.

The security incident report is special insofar, that it contains the most comprehensive data coverage of any report in the industry. It includes over 600 million data samples, executing millions of malware removals annually, scanning billions of e-mails, over 280 million active Hotmail accounts, and billions of pages scanned by Bing each day. The data collection is actually quite impressive. The data included is gathered from a wide range of Microsoft products and services globally, including: Bing, Windows Live Hotmail, Forefront Online Protection for Exchange, Windows Defender, the Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT), Microsoft Forefront Client Security, Windows Live OneCare, Microsoft Security Essentials and the Phishing Filter in Internet Explorer.

You can read and download the report at www.microsoft.com/sir. Maybe not something to put on your bedside table as it will probably keep you awake at night!

About the Author

Reto is partner at PwC Switzerland. He is leading the Cybersecurity practice and is member of PwC Digital Services leadership Team. He has over 15 years work experience in an information security and risk focused IT environment. Prior to working at PwC he was Microsoft's Chief Security Officer for Western Europe and also has work experience as group CIO, Chief Risk Officer, Technical Director and Program Manager.

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